Storm Chasers chased out of San Antonio

San Antonio Local Roofers
By San Antonio Local Roofers August 4, 2011 03:21

Storm Chasers chased out of San Antonio

Story Highlights

  • "It is not uncommon for out-of-town storm chasers to solicit business after storms like the ones we've had this spring and summer," said Mr. King, president of the Western Pennsylvania Better Business Bureau.
  • "Storm chasers may not have proper licensure for your area and may offer quick fixes or make big promises" they don't honor, he said. "We've been getting calls about them every day since the tornado that hit Westmoreland County on March 23." Its 120 mph winds destroyed eight homes and heavily damaged 40 others.

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A storm strikes, the damage is widespread and property owners strive to recover, a process that can take months.

In the case of uprooted trees, flattened shrubbery and broken windows, relatives, friends and co-workers often are among the first to invest their time, skills and tools to help homeowners and business owners.

Armed with saws, rakes and tool boxes, they cut up the trees, redd up the property and repair/replace what they can. Local municipalities usually provide Dumpsters to haul away debris.

But there’s another breed of individual who suddenly appears after terrifying weather events raise havoc in a neighborhood or community.

Warren King calls them “storm chasers.”

“It is not uncommon for out-of-town storm chasers to solicit business after storms like the ones we’ve had this spring and summer,” said Mr. King, president of the Western Pennsylvania Better Business Bureau.

“Storm chasers may not have proper licensure for your area and may offer quick fixes or make big promises” they don’t honor, he said. “We’ve been getting calls about them every day since the tornado that hit Westmoreland County on March 23.” Its 120 mph winds destroyed eight homes and heavily damaged 40 others.

Mr. King said the bureau also is warning local contractors to beware of storm chasers who pay local construction companies “substantial amounts of money” to use their established name, reputation and phone number “so they can masquerade as a local business.”

This has happened in other areas of the country, he said. One of the most recent examples occurred last year in Ohio, where unscrupulous storm chasers paid to use the names of Ohio companies.

After doing repairs paid by insurance policies, they skedaddled and left the local companies to deal with unsatisfied customers “due to bad workmanship and/or unfulfilled warranties.”

“Violent storms present golden opportunities for unethical contractors and scammers to take your money,” Mr. King said. “Everybody wants to get their property fixed and back to normal as quickly and painlessly as possible, but it is important to make careful decisions and hire the best crews at a fair price.”

Keep the storm chasers away
Thursday, August 04, 2011
By Larry Walsh, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
San Antonio Local Roofers
By San Antonio Local Roofers August 4, 2011 03:21